#8 of 1001 Awesome Things: Turo Turo and Tapsilogan

August 26, 2017
Travelling in the Philippines is cheap according to the budget travelers I met and hosted. When they ask me where they can eat a cheap meal, I always tell them to eat at small stores called Turo turo or Tapsilogan. And these stores are everywhere! 

 

Turo Turo, also known as Carinderias are practically everywhere. Turo means to point. You have to point out which viand you want to eat. You can find these stores in every street, every school and every parking area of jeepneys and tricycles. When I had the chance to talk to repatriated Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) in Syria a couple of years ago, most of them would tell me that they want a carinderia business

 

Tapsilogan is a coined term for Tapa (Cured Beef), Sinangag (Fried Rice) and Itlog (Egg). These stores are usually open at nighttime until early morning. A meal usually costs a dollar. 

 

These stores are not only popular to travelers but also for locals. As for me, a person who tries to become healthy in this Fast Food country, turo turo are my go-to stores to eat healthy meals. Not to mention the support you give to local entrepreneurs and a dirty finger to the Fat Bee and the Scary Clown. 

 

Earlier, my friends and I went to this turo turo near a University hospital. The place was tiny with only six tables and around 2 dozens of monoblock chairs. There were 4 vegetable viands and around 8 meat viands, both in stainless steel containers. I ordered the sauteed bitter gourd and this very tasty taro cooked in coconut milk. The 2 vegetable viands cost a dollar. It was cheap. It was healthy. It tasted like mom’s cooking. 

 

During dinner, we went to our favorite tapsilog place. I ordered TunaSilog and a bowl of tofu. They served it with soy sauce, a very sour green lime and my all time favorite chili paste. This costs around 2 dollars. 

 

I am not sure why we still eat at expensive unhealthy fast food chains when we have these local stores. If you happen to travel to the Philippines, make sure to try out turo turos, carinderias and tapsilogan.

Minimalizing. Is that even a word?

“I can’t go out tonight, I am minimalizing”, I said to my officemates when they invited me to go out for a coffee session last Friday night.

“Really, minimalizing? Is that even a word?”, one of them asked.

So after Googling it, there was actually a term but I am not sure how new the word was except that it has been used several times by those simple living blogs, where I also learned about the word. It’s still on red underline as I write this.

To minimalize the term, “minimalizing” means cutting down the excess. I started practicing this concept a couple of years ago but I fall short every once in a while when my auto-pilot consumerist behavior and tempting advertisements overpower this principle.  Some people would also discourage me and would often tell me that I cannot practice minimalism in the Philippines because we do not have enough. I would always think that minimalism is best to practice in a developing country where we need to challenge and question every capitalist-driven advertisements, products, and services. Where large companies where we hoard products are also the same companies which exploit the poor and abuse the resources of the country. Continue reading “Minimalizing. Is that even a word?”